A discussion of a tragic hero in sophocles oedipus rex

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A discussion of a tragic hero in sophocles oedipus rex

Creonthe new ruler of Thebes and brother of the former Queen Jocasta, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will be in public shame. Antigone and Ismene are the sisters of the dead Polyneices and Eteocles.

In the opening of the play, Antigone brings Ismene outside the palace gates late at night for a secret meeting: Ismene refuses to help her, not believing that it will actually be possible to bury their brother, who is under guard, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself.

The leader of the chorus pledges his support out of deference to Creon. A sentry enters, fearfully reporting that the body has been given funeral rites and a symbolic burial with a thin covering of earth, though no one who actually committed the crime saw this.

Creon, furious, orders the sentry to find the culprit or face death himself. The sentry leaves, and the chorus sings about honouring the gods, but after a short absence, he returns, bringing Antigone with him.

A discussion of a tragic hero in sophocles oedipus rex

Creon questions her after sending the sentry away, and she does not deny what she has done. She argues unflinchingly with Creon about the immorality of the edict and the morality of her actions.

Ismene tries to confess falsely to the crime, wishing to die alongside her sister, but Antigone will not have it. Creon orders that the two women be temporarily imprisoned. He initially seems willing to forsake Antigone, but when Haemon gently tries to persuade his father to spare Antigone, claiming that "under cover of darkness the city mourns for the girl", the discussion deteriorates, and the two men are soon bitterly insulting each other.

When Creon threatens to execute Antigone in front of his son, Haemon leaves, vowing never to see Creon again. Creon decides to spare Ismene and to bury Antigone alive in a cave.

By not killing her directly, he hopes to pay the minimal respects to the gods. She is brought out of the house, and this time, she is sorrowful instead of defiant. She expresses her regrets at not having married and dying for following the laws of the gods.

She is taken away to her living tomb, with the Leader of the Chorus expressing great sorrow for what is going to happen to her. Tiresiasthe blind prophet, enters.

Tiresias warns Creon that Polyneices should now be urgently buried because the gods are displeased, refusing to accept any sacrifices or prayers from Thebes. Creon accuses Tiresias of being corrupt.

All of Greece will despise Creon, and the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods. Creon assents, leaving with a retinue of men. The chorus delivers a choral ode to the god Dionysus god of wine and of the theater; this part is the offering to their patron god. A messenger enters to tell the leader of the chorus that Antigone has killed herself.

The messenger reports that Creon saw to the burial of Polyneices. After unsuccessfully attempting to stab Creon, Haemon stabbed himself.

He understands that his own actions have caused these events and blames himself. A second messenger arrives to tell Creon and the chorus that Eurydice has killed herself.

With her last breath, she cursed her husband.

Tropes shared between them, but handled in different ways:

Creon blames himself for everything that has happened, and, a broken man, he asks his servants to help him inside. The order he valued so much has been protected, and he is still the king, but he has acted against the gods and lost his children and his wife as a result.

After Creon condemns himself, the leader of the chorus closes by saying that although the gods punish the proud, punishment brings wisdom. Characters[ edit ] Antigonecompared to her beautiful and docile sister, is portrayed as a heroine who recognizes her familial duty.

Her dialogues with Ismene reveal her to be as stubborn as her uncle. Ismene serves as a foil for Antigone, presenting the contrast in their respective responses to the royal decree.

She hesitates to bury Polyneices because she fears Creon.Antigone (/ æ n ˈ t ɪ ɡ ə n i / ann-TIG-ə-nee; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιγόνη) is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before BC.. Of the three Theban plays Antigone is the third in order of the events depicted in the plays, but it is the first that was written.

The play expands on the Theban legend that predates it, and it picks up where Aeschylus' . Please Twins! played with this one. Each girl came believing that she was the twin sister.

They find out about each other, and realize that they each have a . + free ebooks online. Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day?

Go to: Distributed Proofreaders. Sophocles, the son of Sophilus, was a wealthy member of the rural deme (small community) of Hippeios Colonus in Attica, which was to become a setting for one of his plays, and he was probably born there.

Sophocles was born a few years before the Battle of Marathon in BC: the exact year is unclear, although /6 is the most likely. Sophocles was born into a wealthy family (his father was. Enjoying "Oedipus the King", by Sophocles Ed Friedlander MD [email protected] This website collects no information.

If you e-mail me, neither your e-mail address nor any other information will ever be passed on to any third party, unless required by law.

The surprise relationship is usually either brother/sister, half-siblings, parent/child (much rarer these days than it was in ancient Greece), or, very rarely, uncle/niece or aunt/nephew.

Romanticism Versus Enlightenment - TV Tropes